Respiratory System MCQs with answers

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The respiratory system is a remarkable biological system that plays a pivotal role in sustaining life. Its primary function is to facilitate the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide, enabling our cells to function properly. In this short blog post, we’ll take a closer look at the key components and functions of the respiratory system.

Respiratory System MCQs with answers practice now

Components of the Respiratory System:

  1. Nose and Mouth: The respiratory process begins as we inhale air through our nose or mouth. These openings filter, warm, and humidify the incoming air, preparing it for the journey into our lungs.
  2. Trachea (Windpipe): After entering the body, the air travels down the trachea, a tube made of cartilage rings. It acts as a pathway for air to move in and out of the lungs.
  3. Lungs: The lungs are the central organs of the respiratory system. They consist of millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the actual exchange of gases occurs. Oxygen is absorbed into the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide is released from the bloodstream into the alveoli to be exhaled.
  4. Bronchial Tubes: These tubes branch off from the trachea and carry air deep into the lungs. They continue to divide into smaller and smaller branches, ensuring that air reaches every part of the lung.
  5. Diaphragm and Chest Muscles: Breathing is a coordinated effort between the diaphragm and chest muscles. When we inhale, the diaphragm contracts and moves downward, expanding the chest cavity. This creates a vacuum effect that draws air into the lungs. Exhaling is the reverse process; the diaphragm and chest muscles relax, pushing air out of the lungs.

Functions of the Respiratory System:

  1. Gas Exchange: The primary function of the respiratory system is to exchange oxygen from the air with carbon dioxide from the bloodstream. Oxygen is essential for energy production in cells, while carbon dioxide is a waste product that needs to be eliminated.
  2. Filtering and Humidifying Air: The respiratory system filters out dust, pollutants, and pathogens from the air we breathe. It also humidifies and warms the air to prevent damage to delicate lung tissue.
  3. Sound Production: The movement of air through the larynx (voice box) allows us to produce sounds and speak.
  4. Regulation of Blood pH: The respiratory system helps regulate the body’s pH balance by controlling the levels of carbon dioxide in the blood. When carbon dioxide levels rise, we breathe faster to expel excess CO2 and maintain a balanced pH.

Respiratory System MCQs with answers

Q1. Site of gaseous exchange in lungs is :

(a)  Tracheoles 

(b)  Bronchioles  

(c)  Pulmonary vein 

(d)  Alveoli

(d)  Alveoli

Q2. When there is a decrease in the concentration of oxygen  in the blood, the rate of breathing :

(a) Decreases  

(b) Increases

(c) Does not change 

(d) First decreases, then increases

(b) Increases

Q3. Carbon monoxide poisoning  affects mainly which one  of the following?

(a) Digestive activity

(b) Liver functioning  

(c) Kidney functioning   

(d) Oxygen carrying capacity of blood

(d) Oxygen carrying capacity of blood

Q4. During respiration energy is produced in the form of :

(a) ADP  

(b) ATP

(c) NADP  

(d)  CO2

(b) ATP

Q5. Which part of the human body maintains the body  temperature?

(a) Heart 

(b) Lungs

(c) Liver 

(d) Kidney

(b) Lungs

Q6. Which of the following is not a component of the respiratory system?

a) Lungs

b) Heart

c) Trachea

d) Bronchi

b) Heart

Q7. Which muscle plays a key role in the process of inhalation?

a) Diaphragm

b) Biceps

c) Hamstring

d) Quadriceps

a) Diaphragm

Q8. Which of the following is a common respiratory disorder characterized by chronic inflammation of the airways?

a) Pneumonia

b) Bronchitis

c) Tuberculosis

d) Emphysema

b) Bronchitis

Q9. What is the term for the windpipe, which connects the larynx to the bronchi?

a) Esophagus

b) Trachea

c) Bronchiole

d) Alveolus

b) Trachea

Q10. Which of the following is a respiratory disorder characterized by the narrowing of the airways and difficulty breathing?

a) Asthma

b) Sinusitis

c) Allergies

d) Rhinitis

a) Asthma

Q11. What is the main function of the cilia in the respiratory tract?

a) To produce mucus

b) To warm the air

c) To filter out impurities

d) To aid in vocalization

c) To filter out impurities

Q12. Which part of the brain regulates the rate and depth of breathing?

a) Cerebellum

b) Medulla oblongata

c) Hypothalamus

d) Cortex

b) Medulla oblongata

Q13. Which of the following is a smoking-related respiratory disease characterized by damaged alveoli?

a) Bronchitis

b) Tuberculosis

c) Pneumonia

d) Emphysema

d) Emphysema

Q14. During exercise, what increases to meet the body’s demand for oxygen?

a) Heart rate

b) Blood pressure

c) Body temperature

d) Digestion

a) Heart rate

Q15. Which of the following is a condition where a person stops breathing repeatedly during sleep?

a) Sleep apnea

b) Narcolepsy

c) Insomnia

d) Sleep paralysis

a) Sleep apnea

Q16. What is the term for the sound produced when vocal cords vibrate as air is exhaled?

a) Wheezing

b) Snoring

c) Coughing

d) Voice

d) Voice

Q17. What is the name of the tiny hair-like structures that help move mucus and trapped particles out of the respiratory tract?

a) Alveoli

b) Cilia

c) Villi

d) Nephrons

b) Cilia

Q18. Which of the following is a common symptom of a respiratory infection?

a) Increased appetite

b) Loss of taste

c) Coughing

d) Dry skin

c) Coughing

Q19. Which gas is responsible for the sensation of shortness of breath and is detected by chemoreceptors in the body?

a) Oxygen (O2)

b) Carbon dioxide (CO2)

c) Nitrogen (N2)

d) Helium (He)

b) Carbon dioxide (CO2)

Q20. Which part of the respiratory system is responsible for producing sound and speech?

a) Larynx

b) Pharynx

c) Epiglottis

d) Trachea

a) Larynx

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What is the primary function of the respiratory system?

The primary function of the respiratory system is to facilitate the exchange of gases, specifically oxygen and carbon dioxide, between the body and the external environment. It allows the body to obtain oxygen for cellular respiration and remove carbon dioxide, a waste product, from the body.

How does the respiratory system protect against infections?

The respiratory system has several defense mechanisms to protect against infections. These include the production of mucus, which traps dust and pathogens, as well as the presence of tiny hair-like structures called cilia that help move mucus and trapped particles out of the respiratory tract. Additionally, the immune system in the respiratory tract helps to identify and fight off invading pathogens.

What are common respiratory disorders?

Common respiratory disorders include asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, bronchitis, and lung cancer. These conditions can affect the normal functioning of the respiratory system, leading to breathing difficulties and other health issues.

How can I keep my respiratory system healthy?

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle can promote respiratory health. This includes not smoking or quitting if you do, avoiding exposure to environmental pollutants, getting regular exercise to improve lung function, staying hydrated, and getting adequate rest. Proper nutrition also plays a role in supporting respiratory health.

What is the difference between inhalation and exhalation?

Inhalation is the process of taking air into the lungs. During inhalation, the diaphragm contracts and moves downward, while the chest muscles expand, creating a vacuum that draws air into the lungs. Exhalation, on the other hand, is the process of expelling air from the lungs. It occurs when the diaphragm and chest muscles relax, allowing the lungs to deflate and push air out of the body.

What is the difference between the upper and lower respiratory tract?

The respiratory system can be divided into two main parts: the upper respiratory tract and the lower respiratory tract. The upper respiratory tract includes the nose, mouth, throat (pharynx and larynx), and the trachea (windpipe). It is responsible for warming, humidifying, and filtering incoming air. The lower respiratory tract consists of the bronchial tubes, bronchioles, and the lungs, including the alveoli where gas exchange occurs. It is primarily responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Infections and conditions can affect either or both parts of the respiratory tract, leading to various respiratory issues.

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