MCQs on National Income

Share
Rate this post

National income is a key economic indicator that measures the total monetary value of all goods and services produced within a country’s borders during a specific time period, typically a year. It serves as a fundamental gauge of a nation’s economic performance and well-being.

MCQs on National Income practice now

Here are some key points to consider:

  1. Calculation Methods: National income can be calculated using three main approaches: the production approach, income approach, and expenditure approach. These methods provide slightly different perspectives on the same economic activity but should yield similar results when properly measured.
  2. Components: National income is often categorized into various components, including:
    • Gross Domestic Product (GDP): The total value of all goods and services produced within a country’s borders.
    • Gross National Product (GNP): GDP plus net income earned from abroad.
    • Net National Product (NNP): GNP minus depreciation (wear and tear on capital).
    • National Income (NI): NNP minus indirect taxes and subsidies.
    • Personal Income (PI): NI minus corporate taxes and undistributed corporate profits, plus government transfers and interest.
  3. Importance: National income figures are crucial for policymakers, economists, and businesses because they provide insights into a nation’s economic health. Rising national income can indicate economic growth and improved living standards, while falling income can signal economic downturns or recessions.
  4. Standard of Living: National income per capita (dividing national income by the population) is often used to assess the average standard of living in a country. Higher per capita income generally indicates a higher standard of living, although it doesn’t necessarily capture income inequality within the population.
  5. Policy Implications: Governments use national income data to formulate economic policies. For instance, during economic downturns, governments may implement fiscal and monetary policies to stimulate economic activity and boost national income.
  6. Limitations: National income figures have limitations. They may not account for non-market activities (e.g., household chores) and the underground economy (e.g., informal labor). Additionally, they may not reflect income distribution, and thus, a high national income can coexist with significant inequality.
  7. International Comparisons: National income figures allow for comparisons between countries, enabling analysts to assess economic disparities and the relative well-being of different nations.

National income is a vital metric that provides valuable insights into a country’s economic performance and overall well-being. It serves as a foundation for economic analysis, policy formulation, and international comparisons. However, it should be used in conjunction with other indicators to gain a comprehensive understanding of an economy.

MCQs on National Income

Q1. National Income is :

(a) Net National Product at market prices 

(b) Net National Product at factor cost

(c) Net Domestic Product at market prices 

(d) Net Domestic Product at factor cost

(b) Net National Product at factor cost

Q2. Which of the following is not a method to calculate the Gross Domestic Product (GDP)?

(a) Product method 

(b) Diminishing cost method

(c) Income method 

(d) Expenditure method

(b) Diminishing cost method

Q3. One of the problems in calculating National Income in India is :

(a) underemployment 

(b) inflation 

(c) low level of savings 

(d) non-organized sector

(d) non-organized sector

Q4. Hindu growth rate is related to :

(a) Money 

(b) GDP

(c) Population

(d) GNP

(b) GDP

Q5. Economic growth is usually coupled with :

(a) Deflation 

(b) Inflation

(c) Stagflation 

(d) Hyper-inflation

(b) Inflation

Q6. What was the main strategy of new economic policy adopted in 1991?

(a) Liberalization 

(b) Privatization 

(c) Globalization 

(d) All of the above

(d) All of the above

Q7. Economic liberalization in India started with:

(a) substantial changes in industrial licensing policy

(b) the convertibility of Indian rupee 

(c) doing away with procedural formalities for foreign direct investment 

(d) significant reduction in tax rates

(a) substantial changes in industrial licensing policy

Q8. Who is called the pioneer of liberalization of the Indian Economy?

(a) Dr. Manmohan Singh

(b) P.V. Narsimha Rao 

(c) Dr. Bimal Jalan 

(d) P. Chidambaram

(a) Dr. Manmohan Singh

Q9. The most appropriate measure of a country’s economic growth is its  

(a) Gross Domestic Product 

(b) Net Domestic Product 

(c) Net National Product 

(d) Per Capita Product

(d) Per Capita Product

Q10. The standard of living in a country is represented by :

(a) Poverty Ratio 

(b) Per Capita Income

(c) National Income 

(d) Unemployment Rate

(b) Per Capita Income

Q11. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) measures:

a) Per Capita Income

b) The total income of a country’s citizens

c) The total government spending in a country

d) The total exports of a country

a) Per Capita Income

Q12. Which of the following is NOT included in GDP?

a) Government spending on public education

b) Consumer spending on groceries

c) Business investment in new machinery

d) Transfer payments, like Social Security benefits

d) Transfer payments, like Social Security benefits

Q13. Real GDP adjusts for changes in:

a) The overall price level 

b) Population growth

c) Government spending

d) Exchange rates

a) The overall price level

Q14. What is the formula for calculating GDP?

a) GDP = C + I + G + (X – M)

b) GDP = C + I + G

c) GDP = C + G + (X – M)

d) GDP = C + I

a) GDP = C + I + G + (X – M)

Q15. Which of the following represents a country’s net national income?

a) GDP minus depreciation

b) GDP plus depreciation

c) GDP divided by population

d) GDP minus taxes

a) GDP minus depreciation

Q16. Which economic indicator measures the difference between exports and imports?

a) Fiscal surplus

b) Budget deficit

c) Current account balance

d) Trade balance

d) Trade balance

Q17. National income accounting helps in:

a) Assessing the standard of living in a country

b) Calculating a country’s total population

c) Predicting future inflation rates

d) Determining the exchange rate of a currency

a) Assessing the standard of living in a country

Q18. Which of the following is an example of a transfer payment?

a) Wages earned by a factory worker

b) Unemployment benefits

c) Revenue from selling a car

d) Rent collected from a tenant

b) Unemployment benefits

Q19. Disposable income is:

a) Income before taxes and other deductions

b) Income after taxes and other deductions

c) The same as gross income

d) Income earned from investments

b) Income after taxes and other deductions

Q20. Which economic indicator measures the overall health of an economy by considering both production and income?

a) GDP

b) GNP

c) NNP

d) NI

a) GDP

Q21. Net National Product (NNP) is calculated by subtracting:

a) Depreciation from GDP

b) Taxes from GDP

c) Imports from exports

d) Government spending from GDP

a) Depreciation from GDP

Q22. Which of the following represents the value of all final goods and services produced within a country’s borders in a given time period?

a) Gross National Product (GNP)

b) Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

c) Net National Product (NNP)

d) Net Domestic Product (NDP)

b) Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

Q23. What is the primary difference between nominal GDP and real GDP?

a) Nominal GDP is adjusted for inflation, while real GDP is not

b) Real GDP is adjusted for inflation, while nominal GDP is not

c) Nominal GDP includes government spending, while real GDP does not

d) Real GDP includes only goods, while nominal GDP includes both goods and services

b) Real GDP is adjusted for inflation, while nominal GDP is not

Q24. Which of the following is considered an investment in national income accounting?

a) Purchase of stocks and bonds

b) Payment of salaries to government employees

c) Buying a new car for personal use

d) Purchase of groceries

a) Purchase of stocks and bonds

Q25. In the income approach to GDP calculation, which of the following is NOT included as a component of national income?

a) Wages and salaries

b) Interest income

c) Transfer payments

d) Corporate profits

cc) Transfer payments

Q26. The term “GNP” stands for:

a) Gross National Product

b) Gross Domestic Product

c) National Income

d) Net National Product

a) Gross National Product

Q27. Which of the following is NOT considered part of the national income?

a) Rents received by landlords

b) Interest on a bank loan

c) Government subsidies

d) Dividends received from stock investments

c) Government subsidies

Q28. Which of the following is included in the calculation of GNP but NOT in GDP?

a) Government spending

b) Net exports

c) Consumer spending

d) Business investments

b) Net exports

Prepare for success in competitive exams by accessing a curated selection of exam-specific books available for purchase online through our dedicated link, empowering you to study smarter and achieve your goals

Q29. Which of the following is an example of an intermediate good?

a) A new car sold to a consumer

b) Steel used to manufacture cars

c) A laptop computer

d) A loaf of bread

b) Steel used to manufacture cars

Q30. When a country’s imports exceed its exports, it experiences a:

a) Trade surplus

b) Budget surplus

c) Trade deficit

d) budget deficit

c) Trade deficit

Q31. National income accounting helps in understanding the:

a) Total population of a country

b) Distribution of wealth within a country

c) Gross sales of all businesses in a country

d) Overall economic performance of a country

d) Overall economic performance of a country

Q32. If a country’s GDP increases over time, it generally indicates:

a) Decreasing economic activity

b) Increasing standard of living

c) Higher unemployment rates

d) A shrinking economy

b) Increasing standard of living

Q33. Which of the following is considered a transfer payment in national income accounting?

a) A salary payment to a factory worker

b) Social Security benefits

c) Rental income from a property

d) Sales revenue of a retail store

b) Social Security benefits

Q34. What is the difference between Gross National Product (GNP) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP)?

a) GNP includes net exports, while GDP does not

b) GNP includes government spending, while GDP does not

c) GNP measures the total output of a country, while GDP measures the total income

d) GNP measures the total income of a country’s residents, while GDP measures the total output within the country’s borders

d) GNP measures the total income of a country’s residents, while GDP measures the total output within the country’s borders

Q35. InWhich of the following is an example of a final good or service?

a) Steel used to build a car

b) A car purchased by a consumer

c) Wheat sold to a bakery

d) A computer used by a business

b) A car purchased by a consumer

Q36.What does the term “per capita” mean when referring to national income statistics?

a) The total income of a country

b) The income of the average person in a country

c) The income of the highest-paid individuals in a country

d) The income of the lowest-paid individuals in a country

b) The income of the average person in a country

Q37. The income approach to calculating GDP sums up:

a) All types of income, including wages, interest, rent, and profits

b) Only wages earned by workers

c) Only corporate profits

d) Only interest income earned by individuals

a) All types of income, including wages, interest, rent, and profits

Q38. Which of the following is an example of a non-durable good?

a) A refrigerator

b) A car

c) A bottle of shampoo

d) A laptop

c) A bottle of shampoo

Q39. When GDP is calculated by adding up the value-added at each stage of production, it is using the:

a) Income approach

b) Expenditure approach

c) Production approach

d) Value-added approach

d) Value-added approach

Q40. Which component of GDP represents government spending on infrastructure, defence, and public services?

a) Consumption

b) Investment

c) Government spending

d) Net exports

c) Government spending

What Is National Income, and Why Is It Important?

National income is the total monetary value of all goods and services produced within a country’s borders over a specific time period, usually a year. It’s important because it serves as a key indicator of a nation’s economic health and helps policymakers, economists, and businesses make informed decisions about economic policies and investments.

How Is National Income Calculated?

National income can be calculated using various approaches, including the production approach (summing up the value of all production), income approach (summing up all incomes earned), and expenditure approach (summing up all expenditures). These methods should yield similar results when measured accurately.

What Are the Main Components of National Income?

National income is typically broken down into several components, including Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Gross National Product (GNP), Net National Product (NNP), National Income (NI), and Personal Income (PI). These components account for different aspects of economic activity, such as production, income generation, and distribution.

What Does Per Capita National Income Mean?

Per capita national income is the average income earned by each individual in a country when the total national income is divided by the population. It provides a measure of the average standard of living within a nation. A higher per capita income generally indicates a higher standard of living, but it may not reflect income distribution or inequality.

What Are the Limitations of National Income as an Economic Indicator?

National income figures have limitations. They may not account for non-market activities (e.g., household work) and underground economies (e.g., informal labor). Additionally, they may not reveal income inequality within a population, so a high national income can coexist with significant disparities in income among citizens.
These FAQs cover some fundamental aspects of national income, its calculation, components, significance, and limitations. Understanding national income is essential for assessing the economic well-being of a country and making informed economic policy decisions.

Leave a Comment